25.01.2017 13:00

Neurobiology Lecture

 

From transcriptomics to transplantation: Molecular and cellular mechanisms of axon regeneration in the injured spinal cord

Jennifer Dulin
Center for Neural Repair
University of California, San Diego
La Jolla, USA

 

HS2
Im Neuenheimer Feld 306
Heidelberg

 

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Rohini Kuner is a Feldberg Foundation Prizewinner for 2018

Kuner RThe purpose of the Foundation is the promotion of scientific contact between German and English scientists within the sphere of experimental medical research, in particular in physiology, pharmacology and related topics, primarily by the establishment of scientific exchange lectures.

Each year a German and a British scientist are chosen to receive a prize, the amount of which is an indication of Feldberg's wish that the recipients should be outstanding in their particular field.

Prof. Kuner’s research interests span neurobiological mechanisms underlying chronic pain disorders, elucidation of neural circuits mediating pain and other neurological disorders, cell-cell interactions in the nervous system and development of new strategies for pharmacological therapies. She is particularly known for her work on the molecular neurobiology of pain and has received several national and international scientific awards for uncovering key molecules mediating pain of inflammatory, neuropathic or cancer origin.  [More...Externer Inhalt]

 

Christian Thome has received the prestigious Ruprecht-Karls-Preis of Heidelberg University for 2016

The prize has been donated by the “Stiftung Universität Heidelberg“. It highlights the 5 best dissertations of the university in each year. Christians work dealt with structure and function of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. His key discovery is that in about 50% of CA1 pyramidal cells the Axon originates from a basal dendrite, rather than from the soma. Together with his colleagues in Heidelberg, Mannheim and Bonn he has characterized this unexpected morphological feature and its functional consequences. Indeed, the axon-carrying dendrite is privileged in exciting the axon, creating a fundamental asymmetry in dendritic integration. The work may, therefore, have important consequences for understanding signaling and information processing in the hippocampal network.  Externer Inhalt

Photo: Dr. Christian Thome together with his thesis advisors Prof. Andreas Draguhn and Dr. Alexei Egorov


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IZN Book Prize for the Best Master Thesis in the Neurosciences

Call for Nominations for the 2017 Award

The IZN Book Prize is an annual prize offered by the Foundation BrainAid and is given in recognition of an outstanding Master Thesis in the Neurosciences. Candidates must be current members of IZN research groups or have been members while the relevant work was performed. Self-nomination of candidates is encouraged.

Deadline for nominations is May 31, 2017. The prize will be awarded during the annual IZN retreat, July 09 -10, 2017, at Kloster Schöntal.

Applications should include:

  • CV
  • Scientific justification (one page, single spaced, Arial 11)
  • Summary of the significance of the work in lay terms (half a page, single spaced, Arial 11)
  • PDF File of the Master Thesis completed in 2016 or before May 31, 2017

Please send your application by Email to the chair of the selection committee, Prof.Dr. Christoph Schuster (Schuster@nbio.uni-heidelberg.de).


Izn Logo Chs Logo2016 Cmyk Pfade English2

IZN/Chica and Heinz Schaller Young Investigator Neuroscience Award

Call for Nominations for the 2017 Award

The IZN/Chica and Heinz Schaller Young Investigator Neuroscience Award is an annual prize offered by the Chica and Heinz Schaller Foundation and is given in recognition of an outstanding first-author research publication in any aspect of neuroscience. Candidates must be current members of IZN research groups or have been members while the relevant work was performed. IZN group leaders are excluded unless the work was clearly done during their post-doctoral or PhD period at IZN. Self-nomination of candidates is encouraged.

Deadline for nominations is May 30, 2017 and the award winner will be notified at the end of June 2017. The prize money of 1,000 € is to be used at the winner’s or winners’ discretion and may be divided between equally contributing first authors. The prize will be presented at an award ceremony during the annual IZN Retreat, July 09-10, 2017, at Kloster Schöntal, where the successful candidate will make a 10-minute presentation of his/her work.

Applications should include:

  • A CV
  • Scientific justification (one page, single spaced, Arial 11)
  • Summary of the significance of the work in lay terms (half a page, single spaced, Arial 11)
  • Original paper published or accepted for publication in 2016 or before May 31, 2017

Please send your application by email or Dropbox to Prof.Dr. Ricarda Diem (ricarda.diem@med.uni-heidelberg.de) on behalf of the IZN Award Selection Committee.  Adobe


In Memoriam

A tribute to Peter H. Seeburg (8.21.1944–8.22.2016)

by Rolf Sprengel, Florian Freudenberg

Seeburg-monoPeter H. Seeburg, a world leader in research on memory and learning, died in Heidelberg on 22 August 2016 at the age of 72. Peter managed to cross several frontiers in biology and opened many new avenues of research. Peter revolutionized fast DNA sequencing, one of the essential prerequisites for the human genome project. He isolated and characterized some of the most important peptide hormones, receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, and he provided the first genetic evidence defining which of these key mediators of cellular communication are critically involved in learning and memory.

In his early days as a postdoc at the University of California in San Francisco, Peter’s great passion was neuroendocrinology. His most important contribution from this part of his career was the cloning of the human growth hormone in 1979. This pioneering work in the cloning of pharmacologically important human proteins was fundamental for the founding of one of the first biotech companies, Genentech. In 1981, together with Joe Messing, Peter established the technology of using bacteriophage M13 for single stranded DNA sequencing. This was a major breakthrough for molecular biology research, and Peter used it extensively in his later research.

In the following years, Peter used his molecular tools, resources and technical skills to unravel the complexity of fast neurotransmission via inhibitory and fast excitatory ion channels in the human brain. Within a few years Peter and his team at the Center for Molecular Biology in Heidelberg (ZMBH) isolated all the subunits of inotropic excitatory and inhibitory receptors of the CNS and characterized them together with Bert Sakmann. He showed that the unexpected complexity of fast neurotransmission is due to multiple genetic factors that co-evolved with the complexity of the brain: many different receptor subunits, several subunit isoforms, pre-mRNA editing and receptor associated proteins.

Peter’s finding of pre-mRNA editing in higher organisms was unexpected – both for him and for the scientific community. But in his paper with Bernd Sommer in Cell, he provided convincing evidence that the single nucleoside difference between mRNA and the corresponding gene sequence of AMPA receptor subunits was not a sequencing artifact but was mediated by an enzyme that Peter was able to isolate in his subsequent experiments. More important still, Peter could show in gene targeted and transgenic mouse models that the epigenetic RNA editing of single nucleosides in the Gria2 pre-mRNA prevents juvenile mice from lethal seizures.

In the last 15–20 years, Peter and his research group, now at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg, dedicated themselves to research on learning and memory. They modified or deleted key molecules for synaptic transmission in specific cell types in the mouse brain and described the physiological consequences in very close collaboration with Bert Sakmann’s research group in Heidelberg and Per Andersen’s group in Oslo. Most of the subsequent behavioral analyses of mutant mice were performed by his close collaborators Nick Rawlins and David Bannerman at the University of Oxford. Their findings challenged major dogmas in neuroscience. Peter and his collaborators showed that GluA1 containing AMPA receptors were necessary for short-term spatial working memory but not for long-term spatial reference memory, and that hippocampal NMDA receptors were involved in decision making but not in the storage of spatial maps. Both findings provoked controversial discussions on the function of synaptic plasticity as measured by long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission in learning and memory, and they raised two key questions for neuroscience: whether working memory is necessary for the formation of long-term memory and whether the hippocampus is the storage region for spatial maps. Further studies are necessary to answer these questions. Tragically, Peter will no longer be able to participate as he would have wished. However, his work has already contributed crucially to a major shift in learning and memory research away from the detailed analysis of single synapses and towards the complex analysis of neuronal networks and the communication between different brain areas during learning.

The field of learning and memory research will miss him greatly.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1074742716302957


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Open positions at the IZN

  • One postdoc position is immediately available in Neurobiology (Dr. C. Ciccolini Externer Inhalt). The group is interested in understanding how primary cilia regulate the proliferation of adult neural stem cells. Adobe  posted 01.2017
  • One PhD position is offered in Neurobiology (Prof R. Rudolf Externer Inhalt) to focus on the newly discovered sympathetic co-innervation of vertebrate neuromuscular junctions: development - biomedical relevance - mechanisms of action.  Adobe posted 10.2016
  • Two PhD positions are offered in Developmental Neurobiology (Prof G.E. Pollerberg Externer Inhalt) to focus on new cell adhesion molecule (CAM)-interaction partners which we identified and analyze the functional impact of these interactions on axon growth. The projects are basic research but also aim at contributing to the development of novel therapeutic approaches.  Adobe posted 03.2016

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Managing Director:
Prof. Dr. Hilmar Bading
IZN-Neurobiology, University of Heidelberg
Im Neuenheimer Feld 364
D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Phone:  +49 - 6221 - 54 8218
Fax:  +49 - 6221 - 54 6700
email:  Bading@nbio.uni-heidelberg.de

 

Coordinator:
Dr. Otto Bräunling
IZN-Neurobiology, University of Heidelberg
Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, 1.OG
D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Phone:  +49 - 6221 - 54 8694, 56 39007
Fax:  +49 - 6221 - 54 6700
email:  Braeunling@nbio.uni-heidelberg.de

 

Administration & Information:
Irmela Meng
IZN-Neurobiology, University of Heidelberg
Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, 1.OG
D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Phone:  +49 - 6221 - 54 8219
Fax:  +49 - 6221 - 54 6700
email:  Sekretariat@nbio.uni-heidelberg.de
Editor: Webmaster
Latest Revision: 2017-01-20
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